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Welcome to WE THINK

To lead a FIT life, working your mental muscles daily is crucial!

I will post about why we get in ruts, sabotage ourselves, live in guilt, hate our bodies, and give up.  We’ll dialogue about what it means to be an athlete, how age DOES matter, and what great athletes believe.  And what about overtraining,
obsessiveness, or a need to continue to prove ourselves?  What does being healthy actually mean, really?

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The 6 Needs That Drive All Human Behavior

Understanding your personal hierarchy of needs is key to sustaining happiness or creating change.

I’ve spent most of my life interested in what drives human behavior. Always believing there has to be a formula to motivate people. The belief that if you have the will, you can find the way.

Walk into any bookstore and the secrets to happiness are in abundance. So why isn’t everybody happy? There is someone in the world who has been successful at whatever you’re failing at right now. Find that book, read it, and follow the instructions. Why isn’t it that simple?

Because happiness, personal drive, desire, perseverance, and success are personal. Very personal. We attach pain and pleasure to different things leading us to happiness or despair. These attachments are based on a hierarchy of 6 universal needs. How you meet these needs determines your level of satisfaction and fulfillment. I first studied these driving forces decades ago in the book, Awaken the Giant Within, by Anthony Robbins.

While these 6 needs are universal, the key is to determine the hierarchy for you. As you rank them, keep in mind what brings you immediate joy may not be behaviors that ultimately make you feel good, are actually good for you, are good for those around you, and serve the greater good.

True life mastery is achieved when your experiences align with these six priority needs.

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Top 12 Life Notions I Wish I Knew at 20

Wisdom comes from age, earned through experience, but a heads up sure helps.

As I approach my 49th birthday, I wonder how many more life lessons I still have to learn the hard way. Those mishaps that could be prevented if I knew better.

Some of us grow up as sponges while others are bricks. Being hard headed isn’t always bad. You forgo the opportunity to leap frog over obstacles others previously conquered. Rather, you choose to face each adversity head on and figure out your own way. The sponge moves ahead faster but may be less equipped to deal with life’s curve balls.

If you’ve read my Sid’s Sense series, you certainly know I’ve lived as a sponge. Adding 49 years of life experience to that borrowed wisdom is what motivated me to share this list. After decades of discovery, here are few life notions I wish I knew when I was twenty.

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Words We Should(n’t) Live By

Proceed with caution when using common clichés.

Protect yourself from potentially harmful clichés.

Clichés are so popular in America that there’s hardly a day you don’t say or hear one. I read hundreds of clichés in preparing this post and their value is apparent.

Used to validate, encourage, dismiss, or explain behavior, clichés are catchy language crutches that justify intention.

We need them. Their overuse is useful. Everyone knows what we mean without explanation. Listeners accept our word jingle as a condensed proclamation of our current state of affairs.

But watch out. Some clichés can be dicey. 

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Arriving at Excellence

You are better off improving your strengths than improving your weaknesses.

You are the only one who can use your ability!

When my husband and I started our business 28 years ago, neither one of us knew much about entrepreneurship.

My husband doesn’t like to talk on the phone, interview job applicants, or close deals. He’s best at design and production work. On the other hand, give me a mechanical task and you’ll find me holding a white flag of surrender before I even start.

It didn’t take long to reveal that his 10 fingers and my mouth were the keys to our business succeeding. Instead of me learning production tasks and him speaking to customers, we divided up responsibility based on our individual strengths.

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Under the Covers: Wild by Cheryl Strayed

Welcome to Under the Covers, an on-going series of book reviews to enrich the way we think, move, eat and connect.

In my Under the Covers book series, I will rate each book based on its “Life Wisdom” value (from 1 to 5 wise owls). I will review books that inspire, motivate and teach life lessons. Some of our greatest wisdom comes from those whose journeys may be quite different from our own.

When we escape into their world, we can learn from their trials, tactics, and courage. Through their wisdom, we add to our own.

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Tips to Tact

One of the greatest skills you can master is tactfulness.

Sticks and stones may break your bones but words can crush you.

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Peel Yourself

Peel back the layers and then solve your problem.

I often wonder if I resumed being a therapist today, would I rely more on my college degrees or my wisdom from living 48 years? I know. That’s laughable.

There’s at least one concept I did learn in class that seems to have stuck. Here’s a jump start to solving your own (or someone else’s) problems.

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Say Cheese

Sometimes we all feel the camera is pointed in the wrong direction.

[Image post by Grim Cris in quotes]

"A life spent making mistakes is not only more honorable, but more useful than a life spent doing nothing." George Bernard Shaw

Learn To Love the Plateau

The plateau is a valuable part of the process.

You want to be moving. But you’re not. Stuck in the mud. Pressing against the wind. Melting into the quicksand. You work so hard and seem to be getting all the way to NOWHERE!

Here comes that evil, pulverizing question again. The one that grinds up your dreams and spits them out.

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Miss Fix-It

Sometimes it's better to just let the feelings be.

I ran a 5k race this over the weekend with my husband and teenage daughter.

This distance is short but that’s also why it’s so tough. You have to be a racehorse ready to roll as soon as the gate opens. There’s something magical about being in the midst of other runners that makes you suffer more.  Misery hurts but also propels you to the finish line sooner.

For all practical purposes, the morning went well. We walked away with 3 medals- well, actually 2. One participant’s triumph turned our victorious morning on its head.

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