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RUNNING Away From Injury: Strength Part II

Runners often have tunnel vision.

View previous post in this series, RUNNING Away From Injury.

The only thing we turn is our heads.

Runners train in one direction- forward. Even triathletes who train in 3 sports still move straight ahead to swim, bike and run.

We can’t always run on perfectly groomed dirt paths. Most of us spend our time on roads, treadmills, tracks and unfortunately, sidewalks. Our feet may hit the road but the force reverberates up through our entire body. Not only can this cause injury, it adds to our fatigue.

If we want to improve our endurance and lessen our risk of injury, we must recruit supporting muscles and ligaments and strengthen them. Read more

RUNNING Away From Injury: Strength Part I

For runners, strength training should target certain areas of the body.

View previous post in this series, RUNNING Away From Injury.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Running pounds your body. The repetitive impact that strengthens your bones can wreak havoc on your joints. When you run, you simply run. There are no moves or strategic plays like most sports. Fast or slow, you put one foot in front of the other and propel yourself forward. That is, until something hurts.

Don’t ignore strength training if you want to run injury free. The previous post in this series focused on stretching those areas that tighten up when you run. Now I’m sharing exercises that strengthen those parts of your body most susceptible to injury.

Prevention is key. Cross training is highly recommended. Any sport or movement that has you move laterally (side to side). Not only will you be stronger in general but you’ll prevent burnout.

Today I’ll be focusing on your hips, hip flexors, glutes, and outer thigh. Next week I’ll hone in on lateral movement exercises with a couple running simulation strength moves.

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RUNNING Away From Injury: Stretched Out

It takes a lot longer to heal from injury than it does to prevent it.

View previous post in this series, RUNNING Away From Injury.

A dedicated runner who gets injured is not in a good mood. Cranky, impatient, and feeling low, many injured runners ignore their pain and lace up anyway. It’s too painful NOT to.

Running pounds the body relentlessly. It can take years for the joints, muscles and soft tissues to accept the beating. When your body adapts, your bones become more dense and your muscles grow stronger. Running is a healthy activity, burns mega calories, and will help you stay fit.

Devoting a little time to your body off the streets can help your body adapt to the stresses of repetitive foot strikes on hard surfaces. Read more

RUNNING Away From Injury: The 5 Commandments

One of the best ways to stay fit is also one of the quickest ways to get injured.

My foot was in a cast for 2 weeks after my first Boston Marathon. Don’t let the smile fool you. 26.2 miles of excruciating pain.

Welcome to my new 5 part series on running injuries. For the next 5 weeks, I’ll devote a weekly post to tips and strategies to keeping yourself running healthy.

I don’t know of any sport more laden with injuries than running. Pick up any running or fitness magazine and you’ll find plenty of reasons to conclude it’s a risky sport.  You probably know someone who’s been laid up due to a running related injury.

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The 7 Deadly Sins at the Gym

Gym rats learn a lot from observation.

I’ve seen trainers and members come and go over the years at my gym. I’ve been there so long I’ve secretly given people nicknames because, frankly, I see them more than my best friends. There’s “rooster” and “diva darling” and “tough monkey.”  (Please don’t ask for the explanations:)

A gym rat is that person who religiously goes to the gym. Whenever you go, the rat is there so you just want to assume they live there. I know because I was one. Read more

Hangin’ It Up Feels Great

Inversion tables are worth your money.

A multiple purpose tool worthy of taking up valuable space. Read more

The Sexy Muscle

Go for the curves you want, not the ones you don't.

I think shoulders are the most beautiful part of a FIT body. Read more

ABsolutely Core Crazed- Part VI

Core Lore & Skitz Core Secrets

View previous posts in this series, ABsolutely Core Crazed.

If you have been following this series, then you have a lot to keep you busy for awhile working toward those ripped abs! More importantly, you will be making the trunk of your body stable and strong. Strong arms and legs are great but without a strong center structure from which those limbs sprout from, you are inviting injury and fatigue.

As I said in Part I, if you work your core for no other reason than to prevent back problems, that’s a good enough reason.

When it comes to core work, here is what I DON’T recommend: Read more

ABsolutely Core Crazed- Part V

Planks reveal the truth about your core strength.

View previous posts in this series, ABsolutely Core Crazed.

You wouldn’t think that an exercise where you stay perfectly still could make so many body parts stronger.  There are many versions of the plank, many I will illustrate here. In a nutshell, you straighten your body like a board and hold it there.

This simple exercise works your entire core, back, quads, ankles, arms, shoulders, butt, and brain.  A stationary pose that looks so easy can be downright torturous!  It’s a hoot to see big, strong guys drop to their knees in agony when I challenge them in a plank contest.  I haven’t lost one yet!

If you promise to try these plank variations to improve your core strength, I’ll share a few of my secrets to holding a plank longer in my final post of this series next week.  Then make sure and write me when you challenge Hercules at the gym and win!

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ABsolutely Core Crazed- Part IV

Stability balls and stand up abs challenge the entire body.

View previous posts in this series, ABsolutely Core Crazed.

There is no end to the usefulness of a stability ball.  This is one fitness device that has stood the test of time and for good reason.  My favorite uses are for stretching and core work.  So let’s get rolling! Read more